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Diazinon poisoning

 

Definition

Diazinon is an insecticide, a product used to kill or control bugs. Poisoning can occur if you swallow this product.

This is for information only and not for use in the treatment or management of an actual poison exposure. If you have an exposure, you should call your local emergency number (such as 911) or the National Poison Control Center at 1-800-222-1222.

For information on other insecticide poisonings, see Insecticides.

Alternative Names

Bazinon poisoning; Diazol poisoning; Gardentox poisoning; Knox-Out poisoning; Spectracide poisoning

Symptoms
  • Eyes, ears, nose, and throat
    • Heart and blood circulation
    • Low or high blood pressure
    • Slow or rapid heart rate
    • Convulsions
  • Lungs
    • Breathing difficulty
    • Chest tightness
  • Nervous system
  • Skin
    • Irritation
    • Redness
    • Sweating
  • Stomach and gastrointestinal tract
    • Abdominal cramps
    • Diarrhea
    • Loss of appetite
    • Nausea
    • Vomiting
Poisonous Ingredient
  • Diazinon
Where Found

Diazinon is a specific ingredient found in some insecticides. In 2004, the FDA banned the sale of household products containing diazinon.

Home Treatment

Call the Poison Control Center for appropriate treatment instructions. If the insecticide is on the skin, wash the area thoroughly for at least 15 minutes.

Before Calling Emergency

Determine the following information:

  • Patient's age, weight, and condition
  • Name of the product (ingredients and strengths, if known)
  • Time it was swallowed
  • Amount swallowed
Poison Control, or a local emergency number

The National Poison Control Center (1-800-222-1222) can be called from anywhere in the United States. This national hotline number will let you talk to experts in poisoning. They will give you further instructions.

This is a free and confidential service. All local poison control centers in the United States use this national number. You should call if you have any questions about poisoning or poison prevention. It does NOT need to be an emergency. You can call for any reason, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Take the container with you to the hospital, if possible.

See: National Poison Control Center.

What to expect at the emergency room

The health care provider will measure and monitor the patient's vital signs, including temperature, pulse, breathing rate, and blood pressure. Blood and urine tests will be done. Symptoms will be treated as appropriate. The patient may receive:

  • Breathing help
  • Fluids through a vein (IV)
  • Irrigation (washing of the skin and eyes), perhaps every few hours for several days
  • Medicine (antidote) to reverse the effects of the poison
  • Tube through the mouth into the stomach to wash out the stomach (gastric lavage)
Expectations (prognosis)

Patients that continue to improve over the first 4 to 6 hours (after medical treatment) usually recover. Prolonged treatment often is needed to reverse the poisoning, including intensive care hospitalization and long-term therapy. Some toxicity may persist for weeks or months, or even longer.

References

Robey WC III, Meggs WJ. Insecticides, herbicides, rodenticides. In: Tintinalli JE, Kelen GD, Stapczynski JS, Ma OJ, Cline DM, eds. Emergency Medicine: A Comprehensive Study Guide. 6th ed. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill; 2004:chap 182.

Aaron CK. Pesticides. In: Marx J, ed. Rosen’s Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 6th ed. St Philadelphia, Pa: Mosby Elsevier; 2006:chap 161.


Review Date: 7/20/2009
Reviewed By: Jacob L. Heller, MD, MHA, Emergency Medicine, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, Washington. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.
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