Contact Us  |  Search: 
Printer Friendly VersionEmail A FriendAdd ThisIncrease Text SizeDecrease Text Size

Vomiting blood

 

Definition

Vomiting blood is a backward flowing (regurgitation) of blood through the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The upper GI tract includes the stomach, mouth, throat, esophagus (the swallowing tube), and the first part of the small intestine.

Alternative Names

Hematemesis; Blood in the vomit

Common Causes

There are several reasons why someone may vomit blood. For example, vomiting that is very forceful or continues for a very long time may cause a tear in the small blood vessels of the throat or the esophagus, producing streaks of blood in the vomit.

Other causes may include:

  • Bleeding ulcer in the stomach, first part of the small intestine, or esophagus
  • Bleeding esophageal varices or stomach varices
  • Defects in the blood vessels of the GI tract
  • Infection of the stomach and intestines (gastroenteritis)
  • Inflammation of the esophagus lining (esophagitis)
  • Inflammation of the stomach lining (gastritis)
  • Irritation or erosion of the lining of the esophagus or stomach
  • Swallowing blood (for example, swallowed after a nosebleed)
  • Tumors of the stomach or esophagus
Home Care

Although not all situations are the result of a major medical problem, this is difficult to know without a medical evaluation. Seek immediate medical attention.

Call your health care provider if

Call your doctor or go to the emergency room if vomiting of blood occurs -- this requires immediate medical evaluation.

What to expect at your health care provider's office

The doctor will examine you and ask questions such as:

  • When did the vomiting begin?
  • Have you ever vomited blood before?
  • How much blood was in the vomit?
  • What color was the blood? (Bright red or like coffee grounds?)
  • Have you had any recent nosebleeds, surgeries, dental work, vomiting, stomach problems, or severe coughing?
  • What other symptoms do you have?
  • What medical conditions do you have?
  • What medicines do you take?
  • Do you drink alcohol or smoke?

Tests that may be done include:

  • Blood work, such as a complete blood count (CBC), blood chemistries, blood clotting tests, and liver function tests
  • Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD)
  • Rectal exam
  • Tube through the nose into the stomach to check for blood
  • X-rays

If you have vomited a lot of blood, emergency treatment may be needed. This may include:

  • Blood transfusions
  • Fluids through a vein
  • Medications to decrease stomach acid,
  • Possible surgery if bleeding does not stop
Considerations

Vomiting blood results from upper gastrointestinal bleeding. It can sometimes be difficult to tell the difference between vomiting blood and coughing up blood (from the lung) or a nosebleed.

Conditions that cause vomiting blood can also cause blood in the stool.

References

Overton DT. Gastrointestinal bleeding. In: Tintinalli JE, Kelen GD, Stapczynski JS, Ma OJ, Cline DM, eds. Emergency Medicine: A Comprehensive Study Guide. 6th ed. Columbus, OH: McGraw-Hill; 2006:chap 74.


Review Date: 1/16/2009
Reviewed By: Jacob L. Heller, MD, Emergency Medicine, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, Washington, Clinic. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.
A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows rigorous standards of quality and accountability. A.D.A.M. is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A.M.'s editorial policy, editorial process and privacy policy. A.D.A.M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch).
The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- 2009 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
MAIMONIDES
MEDICAL CENTER


Home Page
Why Choose Us
Donations
Website Terms of Use
PATIENT
INFORMATION


Visitor & Patient Info
We Speak Your Language
Patient Privacy
Contact Us
KEY
INFORMATION


Find a Physician
Medical Services
Maimonides In the News
Directions & Parking
FOR HEALTH
PROFESSIONALS


Medical Education
Career Opportunities
Nurses & Physicians
Staff Intranet Access

Maimonides Medical Center    |    4802 Tenth Avenue    |    Brooklyn, NY 11219    |    718.283.6000