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Bullous pemphigoid

 

Definition

Bullous pemphigoid is a skin disorder characterized by large blisters.

Causes

The cause is not known, but may be related to immune system disorders.

Bullous pemphigoid usually occurs in elderly persons and is rare in young people. Symptoms come and go. In most patients, the condition goes away within 6 years.

Symptoms

Some people may have no symptoms, others may have mild redness and irration.

In severe cases, they are multiple blisters, called bullae. The blisters are usually located on the arms, legs, or middle of the body. About one-third of persons with bullous pemphigoid also develop blisters in the mouth. The blisters may break open and form ulcers or open sores.

Other symptoms may include:

Signs and tests

Tests that may be done to help diagnose this condition include:

Support Groups

Expectations (prognosis)

Bullous pemphigoid usually responds well to treatment. Most patients may stop taking medicine after several years. However, the disease sometimes returns after treatment is stopped.

Calling your health care provider

Call your doctor for an appointment if you have:

  • Unexplained blisters on your skin
  • An itchy rash that continues despite home treatment
Complications

Skin infection is the most common complication.

Treatments

Power anti-inflammatory medicines called corticosteroids may be prescribed. Some corticosteroids are taken by mouth, while others require a shot (injection). In persons with early forms of the disease, corticosteroid creams may be used.

Your doctor may prescribe chemotherapy or medicines to help suppress the immune system.

Antibiotics called tetracyclines may be useful in mild cases. Niacin (a B complex vitamin) is sometimes given along with tetracycline.

Prevention


Images
Bullous pemphigoid, close-up of tense blisters
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Review Date: 4/12/2007
Reviewed By: Kevin Berman, MD, PhD, Associate, Atlanta Center for Dermatologic Disease, Atlanta, GA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network.
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